Fear over the coronavirus followed the Yeshiva men’s basketball team from New York to Maryland.

The team had its rooms canceled on Thursday by The DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Pikesville, according to Maccabees coach Elliot Steinmetz. Yeshiva was headed there to compete in the first round of the Division III NCAA Tournament on Friday at Johns Hopkins University.

Earlier this week, a student at Yeshiva tested positive for the virus.

Steinmetz said he took issue with the fact that only his team was denied rooms because of virus-related fears and not others who could also pose a risk.

“They don’t seem to be stopping people from making reservations at the hotel based on where they are coming from or what’s going on in that area,” Steinmetz said. “There could be somebody coming in from Italy or Hong Kong or any part of New York City and checking into the hotel. But the fact that we were in the news earlier in the week and coming in a group, all of a sudden there was a change in their policy of who they were letting in.”

None of the other teams traveling to the area for the tournament were staying at the DoubleTree, according to the coach. Steinmetz, who earlier told the Associated Press he had told the hotel its actions were “discrimination”, made it clear that he did not believe the hotel’s actions were religiously motivated. The Orthodox Jewish school’s administrators ended up finding the team rooms in downtown Baltimore.

“It was not what we felt, not what we experience, not what we thought,” Steinmetz said of any potential slight over their religion.

Hotel management did not immediately return a call asking for comment. Hilton spokeswoman Laura Ford told the AP that the hotel in Pikesville is independently owned and operated.

Steinmetz said the hotel called when Yeshiva’s team was only 45 minutes to an hour away from arriving. Hotel management said it had concerns over the news in New York about confirmed coronavirus cases.

A child of a New York lawyer, hospitalized in critical condition with the virus officially known as COVID-19, is a student at Yeshiva. Governor Cuomo announced Wednesday that the lawyer’s wife, two children and a neighbor has tested positive for the disease.

According to the AP, the Yeshiva student who now has the virus had not been on campus since Feb. 27, something Steinmetz said he tried to explain to the hotel staff along with the fact that his team was cleared to make the trip by its doctors and the New York City Department of Health.

“I think it’s just, in general, it’s kind of gotten a little blow up and people are a little bit panicking” said Steinmetz, whose team enters the tournament on a 27-game winning streak and as Skyline Conference champions. “But a lot of the panic doesn’t really match the facts, so it’s not really making much sense.”

He said he believes Thursday’s events will not affect his players as they prepare to face Worcester Polytechnic Institute on Friday.

“They’re resilient kids,” Steinmetz said. “They know how to move forward. They’re pretty focused on the game.”