LAS VEGAS — Two world-title bouts will highlight the UFC 248 card Saturday night at T-Mobile Arena.

The middleweight (185-pound) championship will pit Israel Adesanya (-275) vs. Yoel Romero (+235). And the women’s strawweight (115-pound) title bout will feature Zhang Weili (-180) vs. Joanna Jedrzejczyk (+160).

The men’s match will offer a clash of styles. The Cuban challenger, Romero, is a former world-class Olympic wrestling champion who at 42 still possesses explosion, power and unpredictability.

Romero is 1-3 in his last four bouts. He took two losses to then-champion Robert Whittaker, though Romero arguably won the second fight. Romero also took a legit loss to the division’s No. 1 contender, Paulo Costa, in a three-round fight in August.

The interesting aspect to those fights is that Romero relied on his standup approach and power as opposed to his wrestling. That indicates he does not want to expend the immense energy it takes to wrestle in five-round championship fights.

Numerically, Romero thrives in the clinch (71 percent significant strike accuracy) and dominates on the mat (79 percent significant strike accuracy). He has executed 21 takedowns in his last nine fights.

Champion Adesanya is an athletic, kickboxing-based fighter who will hold several physical advantages. The New Zealand native is 12 years younger, is 4 inches taller and will have reach advantages of 6 inches with his arms and 2 inches with his legs.

As talented as Romero is, Adesanya’s fluid movement, precision striking and young man’s cardio have only improved in his short time on the scene.

Adesanya further earned the MMA community’s respect when he called for this fight. Critics have said he has never fought anyone who can drag him down and wrestle him into submission. He still has not, but the reward of confronting Romero -— and winning — would exemplify a career that could well be more than special.

If I knew Romero was going to sell out and grapple, tackle and wrestle Adesanya, I’d bet on Romero. But I believe Adesanya will be able to control distance and space by sticking and moving for five rounds and piece Romero up with volume strikes.

But I’m not willing to lay that price, so I’ll use Adesanya as the first leg in a two-fighter parlay with the co-main event, the women’s strawweight bout.

Zhang Weili, left, faces off against Joanna Jedrzejczyk as UFC honcho Dana White looks on.
Zhang Weili, left, faces off against Joanna Jedrzejczyk as UFC honcho Dana White looks on.Getty Images

This is another fascinating fight. Ex-champion Jedrzejczyk is striving to regain the title, and newly crowned champion Zhang is looking to prove that her devastating knockout of then-champ Jessica Andrade was no fluke but rather a sign of things to come.

Jedrzejczyk says she is focused on only one thing — the title. She is free of personal issues and has been training at American Top Team in Florida. Her depth of championship fight experience is clearly an advantage, as are her height and reach. In her day, Jedrzejczyk’s size, grit and length were difficult for competitors to manage.

But I think she has lost the hunger that up-and-coming fighters possess when trying to make names for themselves. Jedrzejczyk now has the things that dull a fighter’s senses, such as money and recognition.

In my handicapping, all fighters who go from poverty like Jedrzejczyk did to riches and fame complete with designer jeans, French tip nails, helicopter flights to and from arenas and bodily “enhancements’” are not long for top billing.

Zhang, on the other hand, is a pure fighting machine. She possesses dynamic strength, powerful striking and unrelenting forward pressure. Thus far in her UFC career, she’s been unstoppable.

Zhang does have some issues to address, however. She has had only four UFC fights, and in each she was the much taller, bigger woman. That won’t be the case Saturday.

She will need to determine a way to manage her opponent’s movements and get inside the vastly more experienced fighter’s reach to operate from the pocket.

This is the key to the fight. If Jedrzejczyk finds herself flat-footed, she’ll be unable to withstand the drubbing Zhang can administer. I don’t believe Jedrzejczyk is in position to overcome Zhang. Jedrzejczyk’s only edge — experience — might not be enough against a fighter of Zhang’s makeup.

While I want to believe in the guile and experience of Romero and Jedrzejczyk, the fight game is for young, hungry competitors. Though Romero is yearning for his first title and Jedrzejczyk is focused on regaining hers, I believe each will lose.

My bet: Adesanya -275 to Zhang -180 parlay.